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Daisy Gilardini

When on assignment, everything we do is determined by the light conditions. Twenty-four hours of daylight at the height of the Antarctic summer in January means the best light for photography happens in the middle of the night, leaving only a couple hours to rest between sunset and sunrise. Being in the right place at the right time is a balancing act between prior knowledge and advance planning.

After several days of monitoring advance forecasts, we realized we would have a window of only a couple of days to get good light at the “iceberg graveyard” in Pleneau Bay. We were lucky, however, and we nailed it! Cruising among the icebergs in perfect light was simply amazing.

In this particular instance, I chose to use an iceberg as foreground. I took advantage of the iceberg’s complementary colours, to lead the eye into the beautiful sunrise reflection with the ice field in the background.

BIO: Daisy Gilardini is a conservation photographer who specializes in the Polar Regions, with a particular emphasis on Antarctic wildlife and North American bears. She is from Switzerland originally, and is now based in Vancouver, Canada.

WEBSITE: daisygilardini.com
INSTAGRAM: @daisygilardini
Copyright
©daisygilardini
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5568x3712 / 59.2MB
https://www.daisygilardini.com
Contained in galleries
The Prints for Nature Sale Has Ended
When on assignment, everything we do is determined by the light conditions. Twenty-four hours of daylight at the height of the Antarctic summer in January means the best light for photography happens in the middle of the night, leaving only a couple hours to rest between sunset and sunrise. Being in the right place at the right time is a balancing act between prior knowledge and advance planning.<br />
<br />
After several days of monitoring advance forecasts, we realized we would have a window of only a couple of days to get good light at the “iceberg graveyard” in Pleneau Bay. We were lucky, however, and we nailed it! Cruising among the icebergs in perfect light was simply amazing.<br />
<br />
In this particular instance, I chose to use an iceberg as foreground. I took advantage of the iceberg’s complementary colours, to lead the eye into the beautiful sunrise reflection with the ice field in the background.<br />
<br />
BIO: Daisy Gilardini is a conservation photographer who specializes in the Polar Regions, with a particular emphasis on Antarctic wildlife and North American bears. She is from Switzerland originally, and is now based in Vancouver, Canada. <br />
<br />
WEBSITE: daisygilardini.com<br />
INSTAGRAM: @daisygilardini