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Steve Woods

During the winter months in the South Pacific, Humpback Whales make a mammoth 6000km migration from the rich feeding grounds in the southern ocean to the warm waters of the Kingdom of Tonga in the South Pacific. This is one of the longest migrations known in the animal kingdom. They migrate in order to mate and give birth depending on where they are in their life cycle. Multiple males will chase females, vying for their attention in frighteningly epic ‘heat runs’ and at the same time pregnant mothers will give birth and nurse their new born calves under the protective eye of humpback ‘midwives’. Once the winter months are done and the calves have taken on board enough rich fatty milk to survive the trip back down to the feeding grounds the migration starts once again. The juvenile whales (such as this one) that we encounter are full of energy and curiosity, just like any human child, dancing and playing underwater intrigued by the humans that watch them in awe.


BIO: Steve Woods is a passionate photographer trying to change and help the world with his images. Originally from the UK he moved from shooting press and sports for national newspapers to working in marine conservation in Indonesia, setting up a shark foundation and documenting the elasmobranch fisheries of eastern Lombok. Widely published in the national press, Steve is evolving his career and focuses on shooting wildlife and conservation stories to raise awareness and much needed funds for various causes and NGO’s.

WEBSITE: stevewoodsphotography.com
INSTAGRAM: @steve_woods_photography
Copyright
www.stevewoodsphotography.com
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https://www.stevewoodsphotography.com
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During the winter months in the South Pacific, Humpback Whales make a mammoth 6000km migration from the rich feeding grounds in the southern ocean to the warm waters of the Kingdom of Tonga in the South Pacific. This is one of the longest migrations known in the animal kingdom. They migrate in order to mate and give birth depending on where they are in their life cycle. Multiple males will chase females, vying for their attention in frighteningly epic ‘heat runs’ and at the same time pregnant mothers will give birth and nurse their new born calves under the protective eye of humpback ‘midwives’. Once the winter months are done and the calves have taken on board enough rich fatty milk to survive the trip back down to the feeding grounds the migration starts once again. The juvenile whales (such as this one) that we encounter are full of energy and curiosity, just like any human child, dancing and playing underwater intrigued by the humans that watch them in awe. <br />
<br />
<br />
BIO: Steve Woods is a passionate photographer trying to change and help the world with his images. Originally from the UK he moved from shooting press and sports for national newspapers to working in marine conservation in Indonesia, setting up a shark foundation and documenting the elasmobranch fisheries of eastern Lombok. Widely published in the national press, Steve is evolving his career and focuses on shooting wildlife and conservation stories to raise awareness and much needed funds for various causes and NGO’s. <br />
<br />
WEBSITE: stevewoodsphotography.com<br />
INSTAGRAM: @steve_woods_photography